Subterranean Arch

Darryl’s Historic Subterranean
Gold Mine Expedition

Circa Late 1800’s Victorian Gold Rush Era.

These mine have been dug through solid rock with hand tools (picks and spades) at a rate of 1 metre per week per man with only kerosine lanterns and candles to show there way.
Explosives where also used in sections to speed up the digging process but this also making the tunnel system unstable with miners being injured or killed by falling rock with no warnings.

27/2/2011

Mine #3

More images to come..

I was fortunate enough to get an invitation to join 3 Subterranean Historians to explore some relic gold mines in a small gold mining town in Victoria,we visited three underground mines in total.

The1st was a small tunnel the size of a wombat hole in the side of a hill the hole was on a 45 degree decline we found evidence of a wombat inside but we never saw him.
This was a relative small tunnel system that had ran out of gold early in the digging process.

The 2nd was an old vertical supply shaft (2 m x 1m) straight down 20 metres to the bottom. I had10 min of basic ab-sailing training and was ready for the challenge.
I soon overcome my fears and ab-sailing I went.
Oh Yeh.!
This one was a larger operation but still with only one tunnel and a couple of other short diggings to the sides I was glad to see it also had a walk out horizontal exit ..!!!

The 3rd was where this image comes from which has a total of 2km of tunnel network running under the mountain.
I didn’t get far into this unfortunately as it was flooded and deemed unsafe to explore in its present condition this site also contains some tunnel networks containing toxic gas which needed to be avoided.:(

With this image I have tried to show the detail in the rocks and reflections in the water with my torch while not altering the hues.

this is working in a pitch black environment with only a head lamp and small torch to guide me.

Special thanks to Shaun and the boys for the great day out.
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer:
Darryl Fowler
Subterranean Arch

Subterranean Arch

Darryl’s Historic Subterranean
Gold Mine Expedition

Circa Late 1800’s Victorian Gold Rush Era.

These mine have been dug through solid rock with hand tools (picks and spades) at a rate of 1 metre per week per man with only kerosine lanterns and candles to show there way.
Explosives where also used in sections to speed up the digging process but this also making the tunnel system unstable with miners being injured or killed by falling rock with no warnings.

27/2/2011

Mine #3

More images to come..

I was fortunate enough to get an invitation to join 3 Subterranean Historians to explore some relic gold mines in a small gold mining town in Victoria,we visited three underground mines in total.

The1st was a small tunnel the size of a wombat hole in the side of a hill the hole was on a 45 degree decline we found evidence of a wombat inside but we never saw him.
This was a relative small tunnel system that had ran out of gold early in the digging process.

The 2nd was an old vertical supply shaft (2 m x 1m) straight down 20 metres to the bottom. I had10 min of basic ab-sailing training and was ready for the challenge.
I soon overcome my fears and ab-sailing I went.
Oh Yeh.!
This one was a larger operation but still with only one tunnel and a couple of other short diggings to the sides I was glad to see it also had a walk out horizontal exit ..!!!

The 3rd was where this image comes from which has a total of 2km of tunnel network running under the mountain.
I didn’t get far into this unfortunately as it was flooded and deemed unsafe to explore in its present condition this site also contains some tunnel networks containing toxic gas which needed to be avoided.:(

With this image I have tried to show the detail in the rocks and reflections in the water with my torch while not altering the hues.

this is working in a pitch black environment with only a head lamp and small torch to guide me.

Special thanks to Shaun and the boys for the great day out.
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer:
Darryl Fowler